Archive for the ‘caricatures-and-cartoons’ Category

Getting worse as predicted

Carix Eye View

Following the publication of my advice regarding underpricing and lowering the market value of Caricatures, I felt the need to point out the dangers of flooding the market with cheap artists.

New caricaturists are currently quoting clients ridiculously low fees for their services (and even charging ‘per person’), the net result of which is to lower the market value of all caricaturists in the eyes of the customer. The long-term result is far worse; Lower fees lead to more clients being able to afford to hire caricaturists, in turn the caricaturist will need to work twice as hard, just to earn a decent weekly wage. Pretty soon, every event will see cheap, crap caricaturists, scrawling their trade and becoming common-place. The end result being that no-one wants or respects caricaturists anymore, having grown tired of consistently crap, cliche’d renditions of caricatures being pedaled for pennies… Indeed hiring a caricaturist…

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i do this for a living

I do this for a living – so trust me, I know what I’m doing.

I do this for a living – so I will give you the best service your money can buy.

I do this for a living – so I’m guaranteed to turn up to your event, unlike other part timers.

I do this for a living – so please don’t ask me for help or advice to get you started as my competition.

I do this for a living – so please don’t ask me why I charge so much. Its my weekly wage!

I do this for a living – so please don’t ask me to draw at your community event ‘because it will be good exposure’ without offering me a weekly wage.

I do this for a living – so please don’t email me random selfies, saying ‘I wonder what you’d do to my face?’ without paying me first.

I do this for a living – so please don’t ask me to donate a week’s wages for a charitable cause, by attending your charity event without pay.

I do this for a living – so don’t compare me to some random part time hobby artist you met in the pub, who busks for spare change or draws for pin money.

I do this for a living – so please let me go home when I’ve finished, without threatening violence because I won’t draw you for free.

I do this for a living – so have the decency to let me know if you have cancelled your booking, before I lose a week’s wages.

I do this for a living – that’s why I sit here writing these notes, to educate the public, so one day they may think twice before treating me like an amateur.

 

At the end of 2016 I decided to create a group and a website to promote full time professional caricaturists in the UK and I called the project ‘Pro-Carix’. A Facebook group was formed and later a website launched, in an effort to galvanize the most experienced artists in the UK, but it was met with mixed reactions. Basically it was hard to classify some as professionals worth membership and others as amateurs not worthy. I invited everyone I knew and let them sort themselves out. Some thought themselves ‘too good’ for the group and others proved themselves ‘not good enough’ and left. One scribbler in particular, notorious for bargain basement prices and low ethics, made a habit of letting clients down due to ‘family bereavement’, which came in to question only after he lost two fathers! I sent my condolences on FB and sure enough he left the group! Natural selection I guess. Another scribbler made a very public attack on me and told me to mind my own business how he traded. Fair point, but I will be sure to advise clients to steer clear of these charlatans.

The group is still running and we try our best to promote professional behaviour in the industry, with or without those who don’t want to play ball. Take a look at the website www.pro-carix.uk  and maybe search the FB group if you’re a pro and interested in joining and using the group resources?

Robbie Williams GQ

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Launching soon, my new website venture, catering for the corporate market, offering digital iPad caricatures at exhibitions and events.

I’ve been drawing digital on tablets since their early invention, around 2008, but have always been frustrated by the poor technology, speed and results. Being a perfectionist, I held back from offering the service, until I felt my results were good enough. I experimented with every latest piece of kit, from Samsung Slate to MS Surface Pro, but nothing did the job until I found the iPad Pro a couple of years ago. Around this time I realised that no one else seemed to care about quality – indeed there are some shockingly bad iPad caricaturists out there, selling their scribbles to a hungry corporate audience. So I ploughed my energies into polishing my craft and launching a dedicated website, aimed at the business world, stepping in at the mid-market stage, hopefully fit to compete with the top digital carix in the UK. At worst I can offer better quality than the worst in the UK! LOL

First step was to buy the domain www.itoons.uk, then trademark the name “itoons.uk“, then design the logo, then build a website from scratch and finally to launch the product online. Happy to say we’re on the final stages of designing the website now, so I thought it a good time to float the teasers… I hope you like the results!

Came across a new group of young caricaturists yesterday, all advertising their services online, as a collective. They took the unusual step of advertising prices for various counties, on their site and the fees were roughly half the industry standard! They clearly do not have a long term business plan!

I am self employed. I am trained and qualified as an artist. As such, my business mentality has always valued my services and artistic talent, while realising that I would never be given a wage rise, unless I made myself worth it.

These new artists clearly do not value their services or their place within the industry and by pricing themselves so low, they will only make themselves the poorer and less popular! They exhibit a ‘short term gains’ mentality and encourage existing artists to compete by lowering our prices in turn. Be aware that lower prices do not encourage new jobs, it just means you work harder for less money at the same job! The logical conclusion being that we will all have to offer more hours for less money, in order to win the same jobs; pretty soon we will all be working a 40 hour week, while earning a little above the minimum wage! Is that all we caricaturists are worth??

Get a business plan guys! If you want to stay in business, then find your worth, find your place in the market and charge accordingly. The only way you will get a pay rise in the next 25 years is if you make it your self and that will never happen if idiots like you keep lowering our market value!!!! WISE UP SUCKERS!

 

 

To all cheap caricaturists:

While discussing fees with colleagues recently we found ourselves divided into two camps; those who knew their value as artists and entertainers and those who didn’t care and were grateful not to be jobless! Unfortunately the latter camp are driving our prices down as they battle to get paid less and less!!  One northern caricaturist publicly boasted (to paraphrase) “I charge low fees because I’d rather be working every night than charge silly fees and be sat at home!”  Great business plan brainiac! So what is the net result of your pricing structure? You work more frequently because you win jobs from other artists by undercutting them, you do not create more work by under-pricing, no-one ever said “Wow I found a cheap caricaturist (he’s shit but cheap) so lets put on an extra party every night just to hire him!” No! There are a finite number of gigs available in any area on any date, no matter what you charge. You simply now have to work three times as hard to earn what you should be earning in one night, while other full time artists go hungry, unable to drop their prices lower than you. Well done – great ethic.

Know your value and stop undervaluing your colleagues by association and if you are grateful not to be stacking shelves, then maybe its because that’s closer to your true vocation, but I trained all my life to do the creative job at which I excel and will not be comparing my talent to that of a shelf stacker or fairground busker anytime soon!

Do some basic research, find out what your competitors are charging and value your skill by comparison, then endeavour to raise your prices and standards, instead of lowering theirs to meet yours. If you still find yourself at the lower end of the price scale, then maybe its down to the quality of your work and you should consider retraining?….